The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains - Nicholas Carr

The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains

By Nicholas Carr

  • Release Date: 2011-06-06
  • Genre: Science & Nature
  • Book: The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains
The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains book review score

4 Score: 4 (From 112 Ratings)

The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains Book Review Score: ★★★★★ 5/5 stars

The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains is a great book. Our editors rated it with a top 5 stars.

User reviews about the book

  • How many are going to be able to read this book

    4
    By Fpiano
    Good as it is, it's very depressing. I believe you, but what to do?
  • A Must Read for Educators

    5
    By IT^2
    A clarion call to reverse course from the unquestioned use of assistive technologies in and out of the classroom to their carefully considered selective application. I have been increasingly troubled by trends in education like dropping handwriting; not requiring memorization; encouraging dependence on external information sources; and the tendency to teach to the test, providing a Cliff Notes version of topics without any deep exploration - all justified by claiming that computers and Google make such skills obsolete. I couldn't explain why these trends were troubling but knew there was something fundamentally wrong with them. After reading this book, I know what's wrong and why we need to carefully apply the tools we are being given. If you've been wondering about the impact of the integration of the Internet into our daily lives, this book is a must read that will help explain the changes that you may have noticed in how you think and work. If you haven't been wondering about these things, this book is a must read to sensitize you to the changes so that you can make informed decisions about balancing the benefits of the technologies you choose to adopt against their cognitive and social costs. There are costs involved with the acquisition and application of any technology. The Internet is no different - its costs just tend to be more subtle and better hidden than its gains. And while the gains may be bountiful, the costs may be devastating in ways that we are only now beginning to recognize. Carr calls out the dangers of confining ourselves to the intellectual and cognitive littorals required by dependence on connections to the Internet's information shores.

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